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Film Review: Her

Her (Spike Jonze 2013)

January 30, 2014 | Opinion | by Jenn

Starring Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore Twombly), Scarlett Johansson (Samantha), and Amy Adams (Amy), Spike Jonze explores the possibilities (and functionalities/benefits/limitations) of a romantic relationship evolving between a man and an operating system on his computer/cellular device.

Most of our team gathered this past cold Tuesday in Richmond Hill at a Silvercity (Cineplex) to watch Her (Spike Jonze 2013).

Starring Joaquin Phoenix (Theodore Twombly), Scarlett Johansson (Samantha), and Amy Adams (Amy), Spike Jonze explores the possibilities (and functionalities/benefits/limitations) of a romantic relationship evolving between a man and an operating system on his computer/cellular device: better known as Samantha. This film was very enjoyable and believable – even though it was set in an unmentioned future time. I saw how parts of our world today might potentially evolve into Theodore’s future world. I will even go so far to say it was trend setting.

More importantly, it was really interesting for us here at Silverpoint because it dealt with how technology is going to impact our lives – something we have to problem solve and work with harmoniously on a daily basis. We are all part of the YouTubingInstagramming-hash-tagging-tweeting-Snap-Chatting generation so projecting our lives onto digital forms of public display is second nature to us. These APPS are designed for people to reach out to the world – to find some sort of “universal connectiveness” to other people. This film explored this theme in a really intuitive, yet dystopian perspective, by showcasing how a reliance on technology can actually turn us into more isolated-internalized-web browsers. In what is basically an extended Vine video, with a beautiful high-production value, we see the every day life of Theodore through a camera’s perspective. This calls attention to the fact that media is the main medium through which we experience life today. It also presented a different form of connectivity through sound – visual iconography translated into music.

This movie really spoke to most of us here, and probably everyone else out there who uses smart technology (to the point of an unhealthy obsession), because of these playful interactions. Definitely a must see. It is funny, awkward, quirky, and ground breaking in its minimalist style and simple/modern aesthetic.

After viewing the film I hopped into my frozen car and started my long journey home. It wasn’t long before I realized I missed an important turn and hastily reached for my iPhone 5S. Texting is illegal so I held the centre button and asked Siri for directions home:

“Getting directions to — Road, Toronto. Make a left at Bathurst street in 500 meters…”

Instant help. Instant gratification. Where will we be in 20 years?

Your film-going enthusiast
Jennifer

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Jenn

Jenn

Jennifer fell in love with storytelling from an early age and pursued an undergraduate joint degree in English and Film studies. Cinema studies led her into the production industry and to Silverpoint Media. She also loves music, yoga, and nineteenth century English culture (Sherlock anyone?).

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